Lathe & Plaster Walls?

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WtnHomeBody

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Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« on: December 08, 2009, 01:49:04 AM »
Is there anyone in the area who knows how to build the old-fashioned wood lathe & plaster walls? I doubt White's Lumber, Home Depot or Lowe's do that stuff anymore.

Offline Wiener

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2009, 02:02:21 AM »
It's to labor intensive and costly. The old trademan that could do it are mostly a memory. Actually I think if they had a drywall choice back then, they'd never mix up a pail of mud and nail those sticks up !
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Offline Esox

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2009, 07:54:50 AM »
You need to find a person who was trained as a plasterer.

GIven the availability of air nailers in this day and age, it wouldn't take long to get the lathe boards nailed onto the stud walls.

A really wide (14 inches or wider) taping knife would suffice for applying the plaster, and smoothing it out wouldn't be much more difficult than doing a sheetrock mud job on a really bad butt joint.
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AlphaDog

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2009, 10:52:24 AM »
An experienced sheetrocker who's done things like floating a ceiling could probably help you.

Offline gunslinger

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2009, 01:48:10 PM »
Why on earth would you ever want to?
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Offline Loser

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2009, 02:48:46 PM »
Why on earth would you ever want to?

agreed. the wall interior done the old way doesn't make the building "historic" does it?
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WtnHomeBody

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2009, 10:20:39 PM »
Well it may or may not make it look historic, depending on the texture of the plaster you apply.

Both plaster and drywall have their ups and downs.

Drywall- fast, cheap and easy to install, but dents easily and creates a lot of dust

Plaster- expensive, cracks after time, hard-to-find and not popular, but more solid and durable than drywall and doesn't create the dust from the gypsum.

Offline chattykathy

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2009, 10:44:41 PM »
Personally to me, it all looks the same after you paint it. I would rather sheetrock. Not to mention....you don't see all your labor. People rip that sort of stuff out, (Me included) and then insulate....and sheetrock.

Offline Bigdog

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2009, 12:34:25 AM »
I think Peter Ligamarri's son is a trained plasterer. I'd bet White's would know how to get ahold of him.

Offline BR

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2009, 08:03:29 PM »
i ripped a shitton of that stuff out.  it was cool to see the different types of lath, and  you can tell about what vintage the interior was done from that lath.  the original house had accordian lath, and the add ons to the house had cut lath.  pretty neat stuff.  found some bricks in the wall too, they were't up too high, i've seen some with bricks most of the way up. just curious also, why do you want that done, changing a wall or something and want it to match?  I would almost guess you could lay rock up and then have a mudder come in and make it kind of rough and wavy to match a plaster wall.

Offline tree68

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2009, 09:39:48 AM »
When I moved into my house (which was supposedly insulated, but wasn't), I ripped out an awful lot of that stuff - probably dating to when the house was build, ca 1840, per some records I have.  Dusty, nasty stuff.  I might still have some of the lath haning around, doing some other job. 

All of the studs and structural members are rough-cut.  A 2x4 is 2x4, which was a pain when I wanted to add firestops between the studs.

Some of it is still in place, on some interior walls.  I won't bother pulling it down.
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WtnHomeBody

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2009, 11:06:06 PM »
just curious also, why do you want that done, changing a wall or something and want it to match?  I would almost guess you could lay rock up and then have a mudder come in and make it kind of rough and wavy to match a plaster wall.

Actually, I'm in my 20s, single male, college grad, and want to build my own home within the next five years. I've always loved old houses and am sick of seeing all of these new homes-out-of-a-box all over the place that are cheaply built and would like to build a quality home (possibly from vintage blueprints) that will last. So, right now, I'm looking at all of the costs involved with building, including small details like whether to build old school lathe & plaster walls or just putting up drywall.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 11:08:08 PM by WtnHomeBody »

Offline chattykathy

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2009, 06:08:28 AM »
just curious also, why do you want that done, changing a wall or something and want it to match?  I would almost guess you could lay rock up and then have a mudder come in and make it kind of rough and wavy to match a plaster wall.

Actually, I'm in my 20s, single male, college grad, and want to build my own home within the next five years. I've always loved old houses and am sick of seeing all of these new homes-out-of-a-box all over the place that are cheaply built and would like to build a quality home (possibly from vintage blueprints) that will last. So, right now, I'm looking at all of the costs involved with building, including small details like whether to build old school lathe & plaster walls or just putting up drywall.
Insulate and sheetrock..but it's just My Own Opinion...any stick built home built with good materials is going to serve just as well.

Offline Esox

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2009, 06:27:33 AM »
just curious also, why do you want that done, changing a wall or something and want it to match?  I would almost guess you could lay rock up and then have a mudder come in and make it kind of rough and wavy to match a plaster wall.

Actually, I'm in my 20s, single male, college grad, and want to build my own home within the next five years. I've always loved old houses and am sick of seeing all of these new homes-out-of-a-box all over the place that are cheaply built and would like to build a quality home (possibly from vintage blueprints) that will last. So, right now, I'm looking at all of the costs involved with building, including small details like whether to build old school lathe & plaster walls or just putting up drywall.

If you want better than an "out of the box" home, then you need to forget about 98% of the contractors around here.  If it isn't a "spec home" then most of these guys don't know how to build it.

I'd forget about the plaster (unless you *really* insisted) because the cost is going to add up on you fast.

Talk to contractors about finfishing the home in an older style, with more elaborate materials than is standard today, and you'll get a solid home you're looking for, in a style you want.

Send me a PM and we'll talk about this......
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Offline Esox

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2009, 11:24:22 AM »
WHB:

Do some research on built up moldings, "real" wainscoating (NOT that junk that comes in sheets), wide hardwood (or softwood) door casings with rosettes, hardwood floors (NOT that pergo and similar fake stuff), etc., etc.

There are companies out there that will make custom router bits and rosette cutters, etc., etc so you can match any old style you prefer.

Another thought is to research companies that have torn down the older Victorian style homes and have salvaged the interior and exterior trim pieces.  Most all of the wood is "old growth" with tight annular rings and as solid as the day it was harvested.  They're on the net.

You can purchase the old tin or copper ceilings as well.

Find a design you like, take pictures if possible and that'll be a great starting point.

Be forewarned, though.  If you plan on having an "old style" house designed/built, chances are you'll be facing a price someplace in the neighborhood of 200 dollars per square foot.  You won't get what you're looking for from most of the contractors around here.  Most of them will either tell you flat out "no way" or will highball the price to cover their ineptitude/time constraints on building a house like this.
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Terri

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2009, 11:48:38 AM »
Wouldn't it be cheaper to find a old house that needs fixing up and already has a lot of the old in it?  Just a thought...but Esox is right the cost of it is going to be crazy...I think I'd save on this and put it toward other features, because as Chatty said when its painted it all looks the same... :)

Offline Esox

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2009, 12:23:01 PM »
Wouldn't it be cheaper to find a old house that needs fixing up and already has a lot of the old in it?  Just a thought...but Esox is right the cost of it is going to be crazy...I think I'd save on this and put it toward other features, because as Chatty said when its painted it all looks the same... :)

The best way to do a project like this is to renovate an old structure.  I highly recommend it.

You'll spend 60-75 grand in a complete renovation job (above the initial cost of buying the place) but once it's done you'll love it.

Once again, a majority of contractors around here aren't going to undertake a project like this.  You'll need to find a one or two man team (electrical, plumbing will be subbed out) that will carefully remove the old trim/casings, strip them down and reinstall them with care.

I'd suggest sheetrock for the walls and then have a highly wet down coat of drywall compound spread on if you want the "plaster look".

There are many tricks to the wainscoating, first and foremost have the material on the site/inside the house and "stickered" for at least a month before installing.
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WtnHomeBody

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2009, 12:00:19 AM »
Wow.. that's alot to comprehend! Thanks for everyone's input. In a few years, I'll let you know how it turned out and what I decided to do ;)

Offline Wiener

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2009, 12:51:12 AM »
Start saving, 20 % down I think.
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Offline BR

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2009, 10:48:24 AM »
speaking of the old growth.........what an amazing difference in lumber from old houses compared to the junk today.  the house i remodeled was built around 1820-1840, and the wood used in it is like steel, try putting a romex staple into it, and the staple bends.  that new shit, one swat with the hammer and its in all the way. very dense material that old stuff is, no wonder it takes so long for a regular piece of wood to rot, while a new 2x4 set out in the rain will start rotting in a months time.

Offline Wiener

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2009, 01:05:40 PM »
I think most of the trees around here back then were hardwood.
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Offline animallover

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2010, 08:35:56 PM »
Ok, this doesn't have to do with Lathe or plaster walls. It does have to do with walls. lol I have been stripping the wallpaper in my kitchen. There are a few cracks in the sheetrock underneath. What do I use to patch them before painting and where do I get it? I have never done this before so I know I sound like a real novice. It's because I am. Your advice will be appreciated.

Offline Wiener

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2010, 09:48:20 PM »
Ok, this doesn't have to do with Lathe or plaster walls. It does have to do with walls. lol I have been stripping the wallpaper in my kitchen. There are a few cracks in the sheetrock underneath. What do I use to patch them before painting and where do I get it? I have never done this before so I know I sound like a real novice. It's because I am. Your advice will be appreciated.
White's, Watn Bldrs, or KC's on Mill St. can give you good advice, the're paint and wallpaper experts. They gave me some better ideas than I had.
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Offline chattykathy

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2010, 10:16:43 PM »
Ok, this doesn't have to do with Lathe or plaster walls. It does have to do with walls. lol I have been stripping the wallpaper in my kitchen. There are a few cracks in the sheetrock underneath. What do I use to patch them before painting and where do I get it? I have never done this before so I know I sound like a real novice. It's because I am. Your advice will be appreciated.
Filling minor drywall dents
When an object, such as your furniture, comes in contact with drywall, it can cause a dent in the surface. Follow these steps to fill an indentation.

1 Sand the surface of the dent to create a rough surface for the spackling compound.
2 Apply a spackling compound to the dent; follow the spackle manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure you spread the paste evenly across the surface and press it into the dent. For a large dent, you may need two or three coats of spackle. Spackle is available from any paint or hardware store.
3 Smooth out the surface with fine sandpaper once the spackle has dried. The wall should be smooth to the touch.
4 Redecorate the surface using paint, wallpaper, or other wall décor.

http://home-care.diynetwork.com/home-interior/walls/maintenance.aspx




Offline animallover

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2010, 11:04:33 PM »
Thanks Wiener and Kathy. The link really covers it all. I appreciate it very much. Am very excited about my new project.

Offline Wiener

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Re: Lathe & Plaster Walls?
« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2010, 11:22:25 PM »
Thanks Wiener and Kathy. The link really covers it all. I appreciate it very much. Am very excited about my new project.
Don't put it on too thick or it will shrink/crack, light layers are better. I've used a hair dryer to help with the drying time when your in a hurry to sand.
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